Author Archive

Abdelmonem Achour

Abdelmonem Achour is a Tunisian maritime lawyer. He specialises in both commercial and the litigation aspects of shipping, admiralty, marine insurance, transport, logistics, international trade and marine environmental law, as well as maritime casualty response and subrogated recoveries. He heads up the practice’s Admiralty and Shipping department and is the Transport Headlight leader. He has advised a number of commodity traders and their insurers, underwriters and brokers in international trade and recovery matters. Having obtained his BA LLB at the University of Tunis, he was admitted as an Attorney around ten years ago, is the senior partner of the firm and heads up the practice’s Admiralty and Shipping department. He also obtained a post-graduate diploma in Corporate Law.

Seven Seas aims to reclaim world’s top ship supplier spot

Newly rebranded ship services company Seven Seas is making a splash at the IMPA London 2015 marine purchasing and supply event taking place this week as part of London International Shipping Week.

The company announced it was dropping the EMS (Eitzen Maritime Services) prefix of its former name at the same time as unveiling a new range of services – including for the first time port agency – during the two-day show attended by nearly 200 exhibiting companies at the QEII Centre in Westminster.

Dynagas Seals Yamal LNG Charter Deal for Nine LNG Carriers

Owner of LNG carriers Dynagas Holding Ltd (Dynagas) has entered into long term time charter agreements for five ARC7 and four ARC4 liquefied natural gas carriers for the Yamal LNG Project, located on the Yamal Peninsula in Northern Russia.

Dynagas will build five 172,000 cubic meter ARC7 LNG carriers at Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd. shipyard in South Korea which will be serving the Yamal project under long term time charters. The vessels will be capable to break 2.1 meter ice in both the forward and reverse direction.

Commercial Ships of 2030 Will Be Smart, Green and Connected

The marine technology of 2030 will combine developments from multiple scientific disciplines in ways that could transform the design, construction and operation of commercial ships through the integration of people, software and hardware, according to the Global Marine Technology Trends 2030 report released by Lloyd’s Register (LR).

The report, a collaborative project between Lloyd’s Register, QinetiQ and the University of Southampton, examines the transformative impact of 18 technologies on ship design, on naval power and on the use of ocean space, as the understanding of the world’s oceans is more essential than ever to secure the future of our planet, LR says.

French-Chinese consortium wins 25-year Kribi terminal concession in Cameroon

A consortium of two French companies, CMA CGM and Bolloré Africa Logistics, and China’s China Harbour Engineering Co, have won the concession to operate the 1.4m teu Kribi container terminal in Cameroon.

The concession for the Kribi Container Terminal is 25 years and CMA CGM said vessels up to 8,000 teu capacity would be able to call the 1.4m teu capacity container terminal. “When finished, it will be composed of a 700 metre length wharf and a 32 hectare platform made for 16 metre draught. A first 350 meter length wharf will be operational within a few months,” it said.